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Does Typography Matter in Marketing?

Quite simply, typography is the art and technique of arranging type to make the words legible, readable, and appealing.

In 2013, Errol Morris ran an experiment with the New York Times, asking readers to take an online test to see if they were an optimist or a pessimist. In reality, he wanted to determine if some typefaces are more believable than others. Forty-five thousand readers took the test and Morris found that Baskerville, a 250-year-old serif font originally designed by John Baskerville, was more likely to influence the minds of readers than Computer Modern, Georgia, Helvetica, Comic Sans or Trebuchet.

While font certainly matters, arrangement of the text is even more of a difference maker. It’s what draws the readers’ attention to the details you want them to notice, and can potentially turn a design into a work of art. Popular tee shirt companies, such as Simply Southern and Lauren James figured this out a few years ago, making their shirts fly off the shelves and their brands household names. What better advertising than to have people wearing your logo or brand name?

Graphic designers will tell you that typography is about much more than making the words legible. Your choice of typeface and how it is tied into your layout can make or break a design.

According to Butterick’s Practical Typography, ty­pog­ra­phy mat­ters be­cause it helps con­serve the most valu­able re­source a writer has—reader at­ten­tion. The most successful typography engages the consumer. It tells them what they’re reading and why it’s important to them.

Good ty­pog­ra­phy allows your reader to de­vote more at­ten­tion to your mes­sage. Con­versely, bad ty­pog­ra­phy can dis­tract your reader and un­der­mine your message.

With all the advertising consumers see each day, it’s important to use type in such a way that it attracts your reader’s attention and gives them a clear understanding of your message.

This post courtesy of Firm Administrator, Michelle Knight

Typography Example

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